Monday Memories – GFS World Part 2

Following on from the post on the 30th of March here are the World Council’s with attendees from 1990 onwards. It is a shame that because of Covid-19 the World Council scheduled for next month has been postponed until next year but that will give us more time to save I guess!!

1990 – Sierra Leone
No one attended from WA

1993 – New Zealand
Jan McNamara, Michelle & George Szymanski

1996 – England
Jan McNamara, Michelle & George Szymanski, Patricia Foord, Phyllis McNamara

1999 – South Africa
Jan McNamara, Michelle & George Szymanski, Patricia Foord

2002 – Qld Australia
Jan McNamara, Michelle Szymanski, Patricia Foord, Kate Brewer, Fiona Caporn, Kate Brewer

2005 – Pennsylvania, USA
Jan McNamara, Michelle & George Szymanski, Patricia Foord

2008 – Seoul, Korea
Jan McNamara, Kate Brewer, Josie Steytler, Carole Lovejoy, Susan Farrell

2011 – Dublin, Ireland
Jan McNamara, Kate Brewer, Josie Steytler, Carole Lovejoy, Patricia Foord

2014 – Wales
Jan McNamara, Michelle Szymanski, Kate Brewer, Josie Steytler, Carole Lovejoy, Kay Goldsworthy, Merle Moss

2017 – Perth, Australia
Jan McNamara, Michelle Szymanski, Kate Brewer, Josie Steytler, Carole Lovejoy, Noeleen & Stephanie Stewart

In 2017 we had the great pleasure of being the city that the World Council was held. We gathered at Swanleigh for 10 amazing days it was truly a wonderful experience.
 
Gallery
 
 
2021 South Africa
Jan McNamara, Michelle Szymanski, Josie Steytler, Carole Lovejoy, Noeleen, Doug and Stephanie Stewart (Australian Junior World Delegate)

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GFS Perth AGM

 

You are invited to the 2020 AGM

 
 

Thursday 25th June 2020, 6pm @ Townsend Lodge

 
To download your invitation and nomination form please click here
 

 


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Monday Memories – Post War Years Part 1

During the Second World War much of the GFS work was linked with special war efforts. Many branches were affected by their leaders joining the services and the fact that fewer young women were free to take their places.  Blackouts and restricted lighting in church halls also caused problems. Some of the branches were able to continue, but others closed.

After the war, GFS faced a long period of rebuilding and looking at ways in which it could help a new generation of girls. The Executive members saw the need for re-organisation and new ideas in the Society, and in 1948 enquiries began both locally and in the Eastern States for an Organising Secretary. Miss Leila Granrott, a GFS leader from the Diocese of Melbourne, was appointed to this position for six months from February 1949. This was later extended to two years and it was to be a period of dramatic regrowth for the Society. The number of branches grew from 10 to 27 (including one at Boulder and two at Northam) and the membership rose from 150 to 800.

As soon as Miss Granrott took up her position she began to re-organise branches and gave the Society a ‘New Look’ by introducing a uniform for all member s. It consisted of white dress, shoes and beret, a blue triangular scarf and the GFS monogram embroidered in blue on the pocket.  This meant that members were easily recognised at functions they attended. Through her contacts with the clergy and as a result of speaking at Deanery meetings, branches were either revived or formed in at least ten parishes in her first year as Organising Secretary and membership grew rapidly. Miss Granrott placed a strong emphasis on Leader Training and arranged many training sessions and weekends during the time she worked with GFS.

Mrs Gertrude Thompson was the Chairman of the Society during this period and she gave strong backing to Miss Granrott in her outreach.

1949 was a lively year full of growth and well supported activities, and large numbers of members in their new uniforms took part in the Good Friday Procession of Witness, Ascension Day Youth Service and National Fitness Council ‘Youth Week’ activities, which included a Youth Service at Winthrop Hall, and a Youth Pageant at the Royal Show, where GFS had a float and 100 girls marching. Miss Granrott spent a lot of time visiting branches and giving support to both new and established ones.


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Marjorie Burton Part 5

Marjorie Burton Part 5

At an informal meeting with the country clergy at Mr Henn’s residence after the morning service, at which the Misses Holmes, George and Milne Robertson were present, it was suggested that a memorial to Miss Burton be put in hand at once, with a committee being formed from delegates from the Caravan Committee and some of the clergy.
 
Three ideas were put forward :
  1.    A new caravan to be named ‘The Marjorie Burton Caravan’.
  2.    Some permanent memorial to be placed in the cathedral.
  3.    A sum of money as an endowment – the interest to be spent on books or teaching equipment for a needy
       country Sunday School.
With Archdeacon Storrs as Chairman and a strong committee supporting him, the Appeal was soon successfully launched. All the aims were eventually fulfilled. The mission van, which had travelled well over 30,000 miles through the outback of Western Australia for 17 years, was offered to the Archbishop, but as he had no-one in view to continue the caravan work he suggested that the Society sell it. This was done and the money added to the donations received from the Memorial Appeal. It was planned that a Diocesan caravan would be built when the Archbishop felt the time was right and it would be called ‘The Marjorie Burton Memorial Mission Van’. It was to be 10 years before it would be ‘on the road’.  However, the other aims of the Appeal were realised. A painting of ‘The Three Wise Men’ was originally hung as a reredos behind the altar in St Saviour’s Chapel in St George’s Cathedral, but this was later moved and was hanging on the first column to the left of the west door. 
 
The small plaque beneath it is in scribed:

‘The Adoration of Christ by the Wise Men; by Arthur Murch of Sydney, is in memory of Miss Burton, who travelling in the Girls’ Friendly Society Caravan gave devoted service to the Church in this Diocese from 1934 until her death Easter Day 25th April, 1943.

This was dedicated by the Archbishop on Sunday 25 March 1949. The altar rail at the Church of the Epiphany at Mundaring is also in memory of Miss Burton.

The balance of the money was invested by GFS until the Archbishop was ready to have the Diocesan caravan built. In 1953 he advised the Society that he was accepting an offer of a lady in England to be a missioner in WA and asked for the money that was being held towards the building of a new van. On 14 September 1953 Archbishop Moline received Mrs R. H. Moore, who was GFS President when Miss Burton died; Miss A. E. Holmes, Caravan Chairman, Miss E. George, Caravan Treasurer, and Miss Milne Robertson, the last Secretary. The sum of £739.14.9 was presented to the Archbishop. The final report from the Caravan Committee was given to the GFS Council on 4 November 1953. 
 
The Committee then disbanded and the Society’s President and members expressed much appreciation of the many years of work done by this committee. It was 27 years between the first and last meetings – years of achievement under tremendous difficulties at times, but always with a great joy in the service they were giving.

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Leader Training Part 1

Leader Training became an important part of GFS during the two years from 1949-50 that Miss Leila Granrott was Organiser and remained so until the late 90’s.

From 1951-1969 Leader Training courses were held annually at the GFS Headquarters in Hay Street. They were usually for six weeks and concluded with a weekend at Le Fanu House, Cottesloe. Programmes were co­ ordinated by Mrs Trixie Reynolds during the years she was Secretary of the Society.

Christian Education sessions were taken by members of the clergy and other areas of training were covered by panels of outstanding speakers. As new branches opened and membership increased dramatically, more Leaders had to be trained and 30-40 Leaders attended the courses and weekends.

During this time there were also Leaders’ Teas held quarterly before Council meetings. The Ethel Burt Club and Executive Committee members helped Mrs Lund, the House Mother, with the catering and this extra time together gave leaders a chance to share any problems and discuss programmes, as well as developing the fellowship between them.

Apart from the GFS training, some of the Leaders also took the National Fitness Leader Training Course and gained additional qualifications.

In 1962 Miss Joan Ash, GFS Commonwealth Leader Training Officer visited Perth and took a course of specialised training with a group of leaders. These leaders then helped with the training of other leaders the following year.


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Past Chairpersons Part 1

GFS has been blessed with outstanding Presidents (called Chairmen from 1959). Each had special gifts which were used to enrich the life of the Society. Mrs Elizabeth Riley and Mrs Ethel Burt have already been described in the chapter ‘They Built Strong Foundations’.
 
They were followed by:
  • Mrs Margaret Moore (1940-1948)
    Mrs Moore, the daughter of our first President, occupied many of the positions filled by her Mother, including that of President of G FS and the Mothers’ Union. She was a warm hearted, caring and tireless worker for others and involved GFS in many types of outreach within the Church and community.
  • Mrs Gertrude Thompson (1948-1950)
    Mrs Thompson had been involved with the Society for many years as an Associate before she became President and had a deep understanding of the needs of the position. She held office during the years when the ‘New Look’ GFS came into being and the Society began its great surge forward. She was a dignified but very approachable President and took a very active part in all that was going on.
  • Mrs Mary Knight (1951-1957)
    Mrs Knight was the widow of a former Bishop of Bunbury and was President during a time of great progress for the Society. Through her great gifts she led members and leaders in growth in their spiritual lives and in loving service and dedication through G FS. She played an important part in Leader Training sessions and was always ready to encourage and uplift leaders.
Apologies but we are unable to source photographs of these ladies.

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GFS Australia Part 3

GFS LITERATURE

The publishing of literature geared to local conditions became an important task. GFS Australia published its first Book of Prayer in 1950 and a Leaders’ Handbook in 1953. These were followed by Juniors’ , Members’ and Associates’ cards and Guide Books, plus other literature as required. The position of Literature Secretary on Australian Executive is an important one and former Perth Diocesan Chairman, Mrs Merle Davis, (later Sr Michaela, Community of St Clare) made an outstanding contribution to the Society during the time that she carried out this work from 1972-1975.

Later there was Christian Education material produced at a very high standard. The ‘How We Grow’ literature, prepared by Miss June Johncock and Miss Helen Randle of Adelaide GFS, was not only good teaching material, but is also very attractive and appealing to the girls who used it. Other literature for the 12+ age group was also been prepared used across Australia.
 
 

‘COOEE-LINK’

This Australia wide magazine for Juniors and members is also well produced and is distributed throughout Australia.
 

AUSTRALIAN (COMMONWEALTH) LEADER TRAINING

Guidelines were laid down for Leader Training throughout Australia and training manuals produced. There was an Australian Leader Training Officer and Australian Council meetings for a long time, included a training day for Leader s at the beginning of Council.  Special training courses on tape for Leaders in isolated areas of the country were prepared and supervised by the Australian Leader Training Officer. These were used by Leaders in our Bluff Point branch in the North-West Diocese.  There is still a number of high quality training materials available that is still available for GFS leaders.  In the past decade or so there has been a decline in groups and the need for training has been left to each Diocese due to the need to meet the requirements of each individual Diocese in regard to many aspects of training.


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Caravan Part 9

FINANCING THE RUNNING OF THE VAN

Apart from fundraising functions by members of the Caravan Committee, the G FS branches also supported it with money they had collected in many ways. Some were unusual… in the 1927 Annual Report, under the Busselton Candidates’ section, mention is made that “Mrs Kerr took the elder girls out into the country to gather violets, which they sold to help the Caravan Fund.”

The members made baby clothes and knitted bootees and other items as gifts to be taken to the settlers, as well as collecting books, magazines and clothing. The children gave many of their own toys and the van workers often wrote, in a very personal way, how there was always the right gift available when needed. “A toy shop found its way into the hands of a wee girl suffering from spinal trouble  –  a lovely dolly to a dear little motherless girl – and yet another doll to a child just home from hospital from an operation.” When visiting one family they found the baby had cold feet… “so Miss Benthall gave it the blue bootees”.

In recognition of the outstanding work being done throughout the State by the caravan workers, the Archbishop-in-Council gave an annual grant from 1932.  There was continuing financial and other support from GFS members, their friends, and admirers of the work of the caravaners.  The Mothers’ Union also gave donations from time to time in appreciation of the support being given to their members in isolated places. The cost of petrol and repairs to the van as it travelled through such rough conditions was extremely high. On the very first trip the caravan made, one of the clergy suggested that a box be placed in the van for donations towards the petrol, and although people were never asked for contributions, the coins dropped in the box proved a great help in keeping the petrol tank full.  It was also on the first trip that Armadale GFS branch and the Ladies’ Guild in the parish gave a box of small gifts that could be sold and others did the same. This was always called the ‘Petrol Box’.

The offerings in the Sunday School Festivals at St George’s Cathedral were often given towards the upkeep of the van and when convenient it was parked outside the Cathedral so that the children could go through it.
 

 


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Marjorie Burton Part 4

On 16 March 1943 a service was held in St George’s Cathedral before Marjorie Burton left on what was to be her last tour with the GFS caravan. She was accompanied on the first two weeks of the trip by Miss C. Hawtrey, who gave valuable assistance with the teaching during that period.  When it was time for her to return to Perth Miss Burton continued with the tour on her own, travelling in the large parish of Bencubbin, which was without a Rector. She endeavoured to provide as many services as she could in the outlying centres and took five services on Good Friday at different towns, the last being at Nukami, where she collapsed with a heart attack at a private home and was taken to Merredin hospital where she died early on Easter Day (25 April) 1943. The Reverend G. Johnson, the Rector of Merredin, who knew Miss Burton well, ministered to her the night before she died.

Her sudden death was a terrible shock to her many friends throughout the State , as it was not known  until  later  that she had  been  warned  by  a doctor the week  before  that she should  not continue  the tour because  of the condition of her heart.

The Reverend W E. Henn, the Reverend A.W Curtis and the Reverend G. Johnson assisted in very many ways with all the arrangements for the funeral. The Reverend G. Stanley and the Reverend L. Bothamley brought the van to Perth. On 27 April a Requiem was held in St Andrew’s, East Claremont, which was her parish church and where she had many friends, including the Rector (the Reverend W E. Henn) and his wife. Archbishop Le Fanu spoke at the service of the loss Miss Burton’s death meant to the church and the people in the country districts. He expressed the feelings of all when he said:

“We mourn the loss of one who gave nine years’ voluntary service with the van and who endeared herself to so many.  She gave of her best to the Master whom she served so faithfully, and we believe she died as she would have wished – on active service for Him.”

There was a large attendance of clergy and friends at this service and also at the graveside in the afternoon at Karrakatta Cemetery.  About fifteen of the country clergy were present.

Her grave was later to be marked by a special type of cross, which her sisters in England arranged to be made here to their design, and a crucifix sent out from England was affixed to the cross which bears the words:

Miss Marjorie Alice Burton
Died – Easter Day. April 25th 1943
Jesu Mercy
 
   

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Sporting Activities Part 1

Over the years many of the GFS Sports Days were held in the grounds of Perth College and this was an ideal setting. With the big growth of branches and membership in the early 1950s, a larger venue was needed and the athletic carnival was held at the West Australian Cricket Association (WACA) ground for five years. This gave the opportunity for an impressive march past of GFS members before the carnival commenced and there was always keen competition for the Anglican Youth Council Cup, which was awarded for the march. There was an emphasis on team games so that as many girls as possible could take part. It was always a colourful day and the Ethel Burt Club members served the afternoon tea.

There were also several athletic carnivals held at the South Perth Zoo. The sports ground there was very attractive, even though there were distractions! One leader remembers having to rescue one of her members who decided to have a ride on the little train that followed the circuit of the oval, at the time when she should have been lining up for a race! The number attending these carnivals was very large. 1,000 GFSers and parents went through the zoo gates in 1959 and other venues were also wonderfully supported.

When the Anglican Sporting Association Ground was first established in 1960 and church youth organisations were asked to support it, GFS gladly did so even though the facilities at the time were not as good as those of other venues. However conditions quickly improved and GFS continued to support it in every way for the next seven years, until its identity changed. The support included considerable fund raising and on two occasions a GFS representative became ‘ASA Sports Girl of the Year.’

In 1960 it was Miss Ellaine Wright, a leader from Millen Branch and in 1961 it was Miss Merle Henderson, a leader from East Fremantle. 580 pounds was raised towards the new sports ground during those two years.

From 1968 the athletic carnivals were held at other venues, including the Zoo and Lathlain Park.

There came a time when many of the girls no longer wanted a highly competitive sports day, but preferred a more relaxed one. As a result, family sports days were introduced, with fun events making them more like picnics. Even this type of activity lost appeal, so the sports days were discontinued and other activities took their place.

This was the way GFS was ready to meet the changing needs of its girls and the same situation eventually happened with the swimming carnivals. Although these had been held at Crawley in the early days, Beatty Park was the natural choice as GFS membership grew rapidly. They were held at that venue for ten years from 1963 and this was a time when competition was very keen between branches, many had outstanding swimmers and the aim was always to ‘break the record.’

However, as with the sports days, there came a resistance to the swimming carnival being so highly competitive and the venue was changed in 1973 to Fremantle Aquatic Centre, where the carnival was held for six years. The emphasis then was on all girls having a chance to swim for their branches, rather than just the best.  In 1979 the venue was changed again to Applecross Senior High School Pool, where it has remained until the end of the carnivals in the 90’s. The carnival was held on a Sunday afternoon rather than at night and became a delightful family outing. The programme was a relaxed one, with many novelty events as well as the traditional races. All age groups take part from Teddy Bears to senior members and leaders, with many teenagers involved, so it obviously has appeal for all age groups.


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Happy Easter – He is Risen!

Easter Sunday or Easter Day is the most important day of the year for Christians.
 
It is when they celebrate that three days after being killed, Jesus rose from the dead, sometimes called ‘the Resurrection’ and defeated evil forever.
 
https://www.whyeaster.com/customs/eastersunday.shtml

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Good Friday

Good Friday is a very important day for all Christians. On Good Friday, Christians remember that Jesus died for everyone. He was crucified by the Romans on a hill outside Jerusalem although he had not done anything wrong.

Read on further here https://buff.ly/2IUSaDk


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Camps Part 2

This period was followed by one in which camps were held at many different places, including Point Walter, Palm Beach, Point Peron, Coogee Beach, Bickley, Pemberton, Woodman Point, Yanchep and the old York Hospital. There were many special camp programmes with visiting speakers from within the church.

In 1968 – a year in which Korea was being studied as the GFS World Project – it was a highlight of the camp at Point Peron when Bishop John Daly of Korea and the Reverend Cyril Manuel, who was the Secretary of the Anglican Missionary Council at the time, visited the camp and Bishop John spoke to the girls about Korea and taught them his special song.

Over the years the programmes at the camps have broadened and an ever widening area of activities has been opened up. Now there is always a special theme for the camps and this is carried through the study sessions and other parts of the programme. Activities include canoeing, archery, hiking, swimming, singing, drama, liturgical dance, crafts of all kinds, concerts, bush dancing, orienteering, films and other interesting and challenging programmes.

An example of how a theme is used was the ‘Dreamtime Camp’ in May 1987, which was centred around dreams in the bible, our own dreams and the dreamtime of the Aboriginals.  The importance that dreams can have in our lives was stressed. There were Aboriginal crafts such as drums, shakers, clicking sticks and painting, as well as bush dancing, a nature trail, nature weaving and a corroboree.

Some branch leaders have special skills and enthusiasm for camping and have taken their girls on many branch camps as well as Diocesan ones. Amongst these have been St Aidan’s Scarborough under the leadership of Miss Hilary Skitch, who organised camps in many far flung places, including Rottnest Island, Geographe Bay (out of Busselton), York, Stoneville, Point Walter and Lancelin.

Kenwick was another branch that was involved in a lot of camping with their leader, Miss Jan McNamara, and others. Some of their venues have been Watermans Bay, North Beach, Point Peron, Rottnest Island and Bickley.

Camping has proved itself as a vital activity in deepening the spiritual lives of the girls, developing new friendships, learning new skills, showing leadership potential as well as ‘just having a great time at camp!’
 


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GFS World Part 1

Although Perth is often referred to as the most isolated city in the world, it has not meant isolation from the world family of GFS for the Society in Perth.

In March 1955 16 year old Hazel Wade of North Perth branch joined twelve GFS members from other States who were travelling to England on the Strathaird to represent Australia at the 80th Anniversary of GFS, to be celebrated in London in June. The party was under the leadership of Miss Beatrice Gerdes from Sydney, who was the Commonwealth Chairman of GFS. The travellers also attended the GFS World Assembly at Shanklin, Isle of Wight, where the first World Council of GFS was formed. The second World Council meeting was held in Switzerland in 1956 and in 1957 Mrs Kathleen Bright-Parker, who was GFS Australian Chairman, was appointed the third World Chairman at the meeting held in New York, USA. The first World Mission Project, which was to assist the Mombasa Diocese, was launched and St Michael and All Angels Day was chosen as the World Day of Prayer.

World Council meetings are now held every three years and GFS leaders from Perth have attended the following:

1962 – Dublin
Misses Margaret Bunday and Merle Cream.

1972 – Melbourne
Mesdames Joy Holland, Joan Beynon, Merle Davis, Joan Matthews and Miss Jan McNamara.

1975 – World Centenary Celebrations and World Council in London.
Mesdames Merle Davis, Stella Usher and Miss Jan McNamara.

1978 – Los Angeles
Miss  Linda Griffiths.

1984 – Japan
Misses Valerie and Rosemary Wall.

1987 – Wales
Miss Jan McNamara.

Visitors to Perth from other countries have also provided special links with our world family. In 1966 we had the privilege of sharing five days with Sister Peninah Mnjama when she arrived in Perth on her way home to Kenya. The young Church Army Sister who was also a GFS leader, had spent 12 months studying at Deaconess House and the Church Army Training College and undertaking deputation work for the Church Missionary Society. During her time in Perth she met hundreds of GFS members at branch rallies.

In 1969 two Korean GFS members, Elizabeth EUN-SIK YI (22) and Agnes JUNG AE YUN (21) from the Diocese of Seoul in South Korea spent 2½ months in Perth as part of an eight month training course in Australia on GFS leadership. GFS had commenced in Korea four years before. All expenses, including fares, were met by GFS in Australia. While in Perth their training was supervised by Deaconess Joyce Polson, GFS Leader Training Officer, who helped them develop valuable new skills and took them to branches as part of their training. They also attended camps and special outings with GFS members. The Perth leaders and members gained a great deal from their visit and Deaconess Polson played a very big part in its success.

Elizabeth and Agnes lived with Bishop and Mrs Brian Macdonald during their stay in Perth and a very strong bond developed between them. The girls regarded the Bishop and Mrs Macdonald as ‘father and mother’.

Before the Korean girls left for Adelaide they presented the Diocesan Chairman (Mrs Merle Davis) with a Korean hymn book and prayer book and a small Korean nag, as well as a Korean GFS badge.
 

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Headquarters Part 7

The vision and courage of those involved with the administration of GFS is shown by the way they took on the repayment of five thousand pounds on the GFS Headquarters because they believed the building was an essential part of the caring mission and outreach of GFS. It was to be just on 30 years before the building was finally free of debt in 1956 and this was only possible through the rent from the two shops on the ground floor, continuous fund raising by GFS members and regular financial support from the GFS Lodge Committee.

The fundraising took many forms. There were musical productions at His Majesty’s Theatre and the Perth Town Hall, with hundreds of people in the cast, GFS balls, river trips, fetes and many other functions held for the same purpose. In addition the GFS Associates’ Committee held monthly bridge parties at Headquarters towards the debt reduction.

The Depression years were very difficult ones, as shop rents had to be reduced, and for many years it was only possible to pay the interest on the loan. As time went on, there were heavy expenses for maintenance to the building, including repairs to the roof, replacement of wiring and pipes and painting. This was in addition to ‘day to day’ running costs.

In spite of the careful managing of funds that was needed, these years were also ones of great outreach for the Society, with large numbers of branches and over 1600 members in Perth Diocese alone. A great deal of social work was done in the community at that time and the proceeds from some of the musical productions were given to charity rather than being kept by the Society for debt reduction.

Although the clubs that operated from GFS Headquarters played an important part in the lives of countless people, there were many other ways in which the building was used. There were socials, wedding receptions, exhibitions, leader training, rallies for country members , Synod teas, orphans’ parties, craft classes, mission film nights and countless other activities. It was the centre for co-ordinating the work of the caravan for 17 years and also for welfare work by GFS during the Depression years. There was a committee formed at Headquarters to help those in need of clothes and many hundreds of garments were prepared and given to Deaconess Genders to distribute in her district or to the Diocesan Secretary to help those who came to the building for help. These included many unemployed girls who had heard of the GFS centre and appealed for assistance. Several hundred of these were found jobs during this time.

Others helped were invalid members of the Society, who did beautiful church needlework or made knitted, crocheted or hand-stitched garments which were displayed in a glass case at Headquarters and orders taken without any charge made for the service.

There were many others who used the Headquarters building apart from GFS. For many years during the 1940s the Mothers’ Union had a room there until they moved to Church Office in 1949. In 1968, when plans for rebuilding left them homeless, GFS welcomed them back to their Headquarters for several years and there was a very happy relationship always between the two organisations. CEBS and CEGS also had offices in the building for a number of years. GFS was keen to help in this way by providing economical accommodation for fellow church organisations. The building sometimes saw ‘welcomes’ to new Archbishops and other church dignitaries. (There were 85 GFS leaders present at a welcome to Archbishop Geoffrey Sambell.) There was usually a farewell function at Headquarters when the wife of the Governor, who was always the Patron of GFS, left the State.

The building was a nurturing place for some new organisations needing a large, central meeting room. Amongst these were the Rhythmic Girls League, Alcoholics Anonymous, an orchestra and sports clubs.

One of the rooms overlooking Hay Street was made into a beautiful little chapel and was used for that purpose for many years.

@lostperth @cityofperth
 
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