Mission Work Part 2

  Misses Margaret and Jennifer Lees, twin sisters who served as Missionary teachers in Melanesia, were GFS members at St Mary’s South Perth for many years before they moved to the parish of Applecross. They were also given practical and prayer support by GFS to help them during the years they served as Missionaries in Melanesia.
Because of Government assistance with schooling and medical requirements, the time came when the articles which had been sent were no longer required. GFS then concentrated on fund raising for Missions and a gift from the “Marginal Giving” list at the Mission office was often chosen for the members to work towards.

Branches were also encouraged to work towards their parish Mission Target. Amongst fund raising efforts by GFS members were:

• $100 towards the cost of a jeep for the Anglican Mission at Agene­hambo in Papua New Guinea.
• $100 raised to help with repairs to the mission boat used by Maxine Fuller at Kumbun, Papua New Guinea.
• $500 towards the cost of printing hymn books in Koran language for the people of Burma.
• $500 for a film projector for the Holy Name School for Girls, Papua New Guinea.
• $250 to help purchase a new boat for the Diocese of the New Guinea Islands.
• $700 to build a semi-permanent house for a priest in UIAKU, Papua New Guinea. Most of the cost of this was raised through making and selling lamingtons.
• $700 to help provide education bursaries for students at Selwyn College in the Solomon Islands and to assist Oombulgurri Mission in the North-West of Western Australia.

The aim in GFS Mission programmes was always to make the girls aware of the wide Mission work of the church, and speakers, films and other means were used. Links have been made between some Missions and GFS branches and some GFSers have penfriends as a result of this. A GFS Mission badge was always a popular one and so the interest was nurtured within the branch.

Today, the ties still continue with PNG and the Solomon Islands, with yearly visits to PNG by GFS Australia members. GFS World supported the Solomon Islands with a world project about 5 years ago which was completed in 2018 with a visit by GFS Australia members to help with the project.

@GFSAustralia
 
       

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Monday Memories – Camps Part 1

Camps have been an important part of GFS from early in the last century.

Miss Emmie Holmes, who has been mentioned before in Monday Memories, was keen to help GFS continue its outreach through camps and in 1948 she donated a block of land in Gooseberry Hill to be used as a camp site for GFS. It was in a beautiful position but could not be used for a camp immediately because the area did not have roads, power or water.

GFS hoped  to be able to eventually use the site as a camp, but it was a long time before the area was opened up and in the meantime many camps of a high standard had been set up in the hills and were available to youth groups. The land was sold in 1982 and the proceeds invested. The interest was later used to help with GFS office expenses and branch work.

In the 1950s one of the popular camps for GFSers was at Bickley, although the venue was nothing like the luxurious accommodation provided there now.

In 1953 GFS decided to buy a cottage in Kalamunda so that branches could have an opportunity for regular weekend camps. This was a special outreach for the Society because it was believed it would fill a real need with the large number of members in GFS. The money was borrowed to purchase the Kalamunda house, which was opened and blessed by Archbishop Robert Moline. It was used a great deal for many years, but with girls preferring a regular change of venue, it was sold in 1959 as it was felt it had served its purpose.
 

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Monday Memories – GFS Headquarters Part 6

ETHEL BURT CLUB

At the beginning of 1947 the Married Members’ Committee which had been formed in 1940 was renamed the ‘Ethel Burt Club’ with the permission of their much loved GFS President. (Later on, the club became the ‘Ethel Burt Townsend Fellowship’) Miss M. Milne Robertson was the Chairman and Mrs Boyes the Secretary in 1947 and they continued in those positions for many years. Meetings were held monthly and the membership grew from 35 to 77 in the next five years.

The programmes included drama, recitals and lectures.  The members trained as a choir under Mrs Bird, with Mrs Lappin as accompanist. They helped with the singing at the GFS Festival Services, as well as providing entertainment at various functions. The Ethel Burt Club was a great support group for any Diocesan functions, providing afternoon teas at sports days and exhibitions, as well as assisting with Leaders’ Teas.

It was a very happy club where lifetime friendships were made. The members brought their babies and young children to the meetings and the spacious hall and other areas provided wonderful opportunities for the young ones to play together. One of the special joys was that two generations of pre-schoolers shared these meetings with their mothers.

When the Headquarters building was sold in 1973 the club was no longer able to continue in the same way, but the links of friendship were strong and the remaining members continued to meet monthly over coffee to keep in touch, and did for many years after.

HEADQUARTERS TOWNSEND FELLOWSHIP

The Headquarter s Townsend Fellowship was formed in 1948 for GFS members over twenty five years of age who were not attached to a branch. Miss Amy Woodbridge was the first President and Miss Rose Tuck the Secretary. Their programmes included speakers, visits to places of interest, ‘Cootie’ nights, socials and other activities. There was always strong support for GFS mission projects and they joined in all Diocesan activities. In the 1950s they supported a child at Sister Kate’s Home in Queens Park, which was an Anglican Home at that time, and made knitted clothes for her. They combined with the Orana Club for many events.  

A special project over a long period has been the support of Nulsen Haven – a home for the intellectually handicapped. Members have made large quantities of knitted garments and gift items for the residents and visit the home every year. In 1984 the Headquarters Townsend Fellowship group was presented with a certificate of appreciation for outstanding support for the home.
 

 


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Monday Memories – Mission Work Part 1

Mission Work

There has always been strong support from GFS for the Mission work of the church. Fund raising has been prominent, but over quite a long period there was also a great back-up of ‘physical needs’ for the Mission field. Missionaries sent lists of requests to supporters and lists were also available from Mission offices. Working from these, GFS members and leaders made vast quantities of teaching and other aids, particularly in the 1950s, I960s and early 1970s. Often there was an exhibition of these at GFS Headquarters or Burt Hall before they were packed in tea-chests by members of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of ABM/AMC and dispatched to the particular Missions from which requests had come. There would have been tens of thousands of articles made over the years and a list of items sent to New Guinea and Melanesia in 1970 included 1 ,000 teaching aids of all kinds, 544 toilet articles, 54 patchwork quilts, 20 knitted rugs (made from squares the girls had knitted), 4,538 roller bandages and 755 knitted bandages. In addition, approximately 350,000 stamps and 8,184 matchbox labels were collected for sale, with the proceeds of about $68 going to Missions.
Following on an article in the ABM Review, GFS decided to provide 250 dresses needed for girls at one of the Missions. There were ‘working bees’ at G FS Headquarters for cutting and preparation of the garments for sewing and the result was a colourful collection of attractive frocks.
 
There was a personal involvement and interest in the GFS work for Missions because of links with some of the Missionaries. Miss Maxine Fuller was a leader at St Aidan’s, Scarborough GFS branch and Secretary to the Manager of a big Perth company when she decided to offer herself for Missionary service. There was no vacancy for a Secretary, but there was an urgent need for teachers. She had always wanted to be a teacher but had never had the opportunity to train. She was delighted when in 1965 she was accepted by ABM for training as a Missionary teacher. After completing a preparatory course at the House of the Epiphany in Sydney she undertook ‘crash’ teacher training at Port Moresby.
Maxine worked first at Popondetta then later on the tiny island of Kumbun, where she was Teacher-in-Charge. She had constant prayer support from GFS and any requests for aids to help her in her work were always met by GFS members. Maxine served in the Mission field for many years and loved the work she did. She regretted having to give it up through deteriorating health. She later married and made her home in Queensland.

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Monday Memories – GFS Australia Part 1

GFS Australia Part 1

As GFS spread throughout the world, each country worked under a treaty or charter with the parent body in England, so that the principles of the Society would be upheld. In Australia, each State had a separate charter and the one in Perth was signed on 20 December 1888. From the time that GFS first commenced in this State there was strong support from the Society in England through the Overseas Committee and visits by Extension Officers. They were women with great organising ability who travelled overseas to countries where GFS was established, giving support and assistance to established branches and helping to open new ones. During the visit to Australia in 1924 of Miss Florence Way, GFS Central Organiser in England, she travelled to every State and also to New Zealand on promotional work for GFS and there was great progress as a result of her work .

The Society in Australia worked in close co-operation with GFS in England and there was a strong bond between the two countries. The literature used was printed in England and this was of a high standard . However in the re-organisation of GFS Australia in the post-war years, it was realised that a new structure was required as moves were started in 1945 to make the Society more closely knit.

Mrs Kathleen Bright-Parker, Melbourne Organiser of GFS, was given the task of convening a national conference in Melbourne in 1946.  67 representatives attended from all parts of Australia and this question was discussed thoroughly and referred back to each Diocesan Council. Western Australia was represented by Miss Kathleen Whatley and Mrs Connie Renner.

In 1947 the Commonwealth Council (later to be called Australian Council) came into being, with Mrs B.P. Robin of Adelaide, the first Australian Chairman and Mrs Kathleen Bright-Parker, Secretary. Each diocese was to be represented according to the number of branches, with meetings held every three years “so the GFS could speak with one voice and discuss matters of concern and interest to the Society throughout Australia”.

The Primate of Australia, Archbishop H.W. K. Mowll, accepted the position of first President in 1950. Each successive Primate has also been President. Lady Slim, the Governor General’s wife, became first Australian Patron in 1953 and this vice-regal link, which has been strong since the Society was first formed, has continued.

Miss Kathleen Whatley was the GFS representative from Western Australia at the first Commonwealth Council Meeting and this State has been represented at every one since.


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Monday Memories -Headquarters Part 5

ORANA CLUB
The Orana Club re-opened in September 1948 with Mrs R. H. Moore as Chairman, Miss D. Loukes as Secretary and Mrs R. Lund as House Mother.

It was a club ‘within GFS’. Part of each member’s subscription was paid to the club, which made her a member. Some GFSers attending night school would have a meal at Headquarters first; others entertained friends in the club rooms. One who had a weekly meal there after work was Ruth Walker (nee Wallace dec.), who lived in Como but acted as a ‘freelance’ GFS leader in Mt Hawthorn parish from 1948 to 1953 as there was no leader available at the time. She travelled to the meetings by bus for those five years and enjoyed the shared meal at GFS Headquarters before leaving for the meeting.

The club was also open to those who were not GFS members and there were about 50 of these in the 50s. They were mostly girls living in rooms without cooking facilities, as well as some visitors from other States on working holidays. They looked forward to the fellowship over meals and afterwards in front of the Wonder-Heater in winter or balcony in summer. Mrs Lund , the House Mother, was a very special person who was caring and supportive to all who came to Headquarters and a ‘mother’ to all the girls. There were always at least 30 regular diners each night and there was always a birthday cake from Mrs Lund for the birthday girl. Members and friends regularly brought flowers, fruit and vegetables to Mrs Lund and she spent many hours making jams and chutneys, as well as sewing aprons and other items on a little hand machine, to sell on a trading table at Headquarters for Orana Club projects. The club ran monthly socials to help finance purchases for the club rooms and also held an annual fete.

Orana Club members Jean Emery and Mavis Morris helped Mrs Lund in many ways with the catering arrangements at Headquarters and Dorothy Loukes was always ready to help whenever needed.
 
Mrs Lund retired in 1962 after 13 years as House Mother and was farewelled with regret. The star shaped clock, now at the GFS Office, 240 Adelaide Terrace, Perth was donated by Orana Club members so that Mrs Lund’s efforts on their behalf would always be remembered.
 
For a while after Mrs Lund left, the Orana Club was operated as a lunch club. There were four House Mothers during the next three years, as they were only able to stay for short periods. In 1965 Mrs Helen Kendrick was appointed to the position. She was a bright and cheerful Scot who added her own special dimension to the role of House Mother. She continued the work that Mrs Lund had done and especially enjoyed the Leaders’ Teas and other activities held in the building at the time.
 

Mrs Kendrick

Mrs Kendrick contributed to the Society in other ways. She assisted at the GFS Lodge in Adelaide Terrace on many occasions when an extra staff member was required and was also a popular helper at Diocesan camps. She resigned in 1971 but continued to take a deep interest in GFS.
There were others who had a special role to play in connection with GFS Headquarters and one of these was Mrs Olive Smith (nee Hall), who lived in the building for about four years from 1954 and played a big part in the difficult task of keeping the large Headquarters in such an attractive condition. She continued this role for a number of years after she moved from the building and her plants and other personal touches always gave the building a welcoming air.
 
The Orana Club closed down before the GFS office was moved to Law Chambers as there was no longer the same need for it. However, it had played a very important part in the life of the GFS Headquarters over a long period, including most of the organising of the annual Christmas party for the girls from Swan and Parkerville Children’s Homes, as well as the provision of meals for members on a regular basis.
 
 

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It’s Orange Day!

Today is “Orange Day” – in 2017 at the GFS World Council in Perth it was agreed we would mark each 25th day of the month to raise awareness.

1 in 3 women and girls experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime, most frequently by an intimate partner

Only 52% of women married or in a union freely make their own decisions about sexual relations, contraceptive use and health care

Worldwide, almost 750 million women and girls alive today were married before their 18th birthday; while 200 million women and girls have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM)

#OrangeUrWorld, #OrangeTheWorld, #HearMeToo, #EndVAW


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Monday Memories – Marjorie Burton Part 3

As planned, Miss Burton returned to WA in March 1937, accompanied this time by Miss Whalley who was to be driver/companion until November 1938, when she returned to England. Miss Burton obtained her driver’ s licence on 30 November and she felt it was particularly significant that it should be on St Andrew’s Day – “the first missionar y!” she noted beside the item in her diary.

Miss Burton found a special joy in driving the van and although she often had friends accompany her on her tours, she also liked to drive on her own. This concerned the Caravan Committee members, who stressed the importance of having someone with her in case of accidents or illness. However, she still did many trips on her own, although arrangements were made as often as possible for a companion to be with her.

Miss Burton kept a ‘ Daily Diary’, as did all the workers on the van. These are a treasure house of memories as they cover the 17 years of ministry to the people of the outback. They·are full of drama in many cases and the following is just one example taken from a report by Miss Burt on in July 1942:

“I left Wyalkatchem parish and crossed to Bencubbin…the roads were so wet and greasy that I was travelling with wheel chains on. On the way to Mukinbudin the next morning the van slid down four miles to the next school! When I left South Tammin I was accompanied by the owner of the farm several miles over paddocks, partly fallowed, to reach a better road than I could have found alone. My aim was to make Bellakubella and Doodenaning schools before they closed for the week. After passing the rabbit proof fence the road became a swampy track. For part of the way I had no notion where I was except that the direction was mainly right. The house which I went to for guidance proved to be empty, but a man cutting timber was able to tell me where to find another house. The track to this was so bad, with so many rivers and roads and washaways and much mud, that I hardly knew if even our sturdy caravan would make it, but so much praise had been poured on our engine on bad tracks recently, that it warmed her to fresh effort and we reached the house safely, and – more wonderful still – both schools were reached in time.”
 
 

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GFS Headquarters Part 4

On the 21st of October and 25th of November last year we posted about the GFS Red Cross Emergency Company and clubs that were based at the GFS Headquarters. Today we follow on from those two posts.

GFS RED CROSS BRANCH
There was also a Red Cross branch at GFS Headquarters, which was formed at the outbreak of World War II. Over 3,000 knitted articles were donated to the Red Cross and funds were raised for special Red Cross appeals, such as the Lady Gowrie Fund and others. There was a harmonious relationship between those involved and a lot was achieved. The branch was closed in 1946 after continuous hard work by its members in support of the various armed services.

WAR SERVICES CLUB
With a name that means ‘welcome’, the GFS Orana Club had a special role to play at GFS Headquarters when it was formed in 1940 as a central club for members and non-members of the Society. However in March 1942 Mrs R.H. Moore, who was President at the time, saw a need and changed the Orana Club into a War Services Club for girls and women in the Services, as well as GFS members.

It was based at the Headquarters building and the facilities were a boon to off-duty girls. A meal was provided twice a day for a nominal charge on nine pence and over one thousand meals were served each month. There was wonderful help from young Associates and other voluntary workers, as well as members of the Mothers’ Union. Mrs Moore was a tireless worker in keeping the War Services Club going under very difficult conditions, always cheerful and encouraging to those taking part. It continued under her leadership until November 1947, when the club closed after having provided a wonderful service for 5½ years.


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Monday Memories – Caravan Part 7

Welcome back to Monday Memories for 2020!  We look forward to sharing these with you during the year and hope you enjoy them as much as we do.

Caravan Part 7

There is a file in the GFS Office full of letters which bring alive the work of the GFS caravan – letters from clergy in vast parishes in the outback of Western Australia, who paid a tribute over and over again to the women who travelled in the van and helped them from time to time in their enormous task.

The following comments speak for themselves:

Coorow: 4.1.1932 (The Revd A.W. Curtis)

“We appreciated the visit of the caravan to the district in December and marvelled at the energies of Miss Pine and Mrs Broadhurst.”

Wongan Hills: 30.7.1932

“Miss Dawson and Miss Pine made a really great impression upon this parish and I would be most grate/ul if the y would care to come again any time that is convenient.”

Bruce Rock: Easter 1935 (The Revd F.W. Guest)

“No Rector can help but say that the caravan is a God-send up in these scattered districts. The Rector has to work to a tim table and is able to devote only a small proportion of his time to each district. When the caravan arrives it is possible to get every district thoroughly visited, the children connected up with the Sunday School by Post and classes in the day schools, as well as the people having the opportunity of many extra Services.

I speak for my people when I say no one could have performed the work more efficiently nor won the hearts of the people so easily than Miss Burton.

Also, we must remember the driver, Miss Murray.  She certainly is a friend indeed of the Bush Parson.”

Meckering: 15.6.1935 (The Revd E.S. Bartlett)

“Before I came to WA I had heard of the wonderful work done by the caravan Missioners in Canada, so when I heard that there was a similar Mission touring the Diocese, I was eager to  come in contact with them.”

Wyalkatchem- Koorda parish:  27.5.1938  (The Revd L. Bothamley)

“The Caravan Workers came into the parish on 2 May and left again on 27 May, after a time of strenuous work largely devoted to giving instruction to confirmation candidates. I would like to say what a tremendous help their work has been to me.  At least 30 candidates live, some 30, others 50, and six of them 70 miles away from Wyalkatchem, our main centre. This fact makes ii very difficult to travel and give them regular and frequent instructions. Because Miss Burton, with her companion Miss Whalley, has been able to spend time at night on the farms far away and instruct the candidates, a great deal of important work has been done, which I could not possibly have managed myself since I have my regular daily round to do. I am most grateful for the splendid work that has been done and I pray that God will richly bless all their labours done in His name.”

Dongara: 22.7.1939 (The Revd R.G. Pym – Assistant Priest)

“. . . Quiet spiritual influence of the Missioner, who has made herself beloved by all.”

Moore River Native Settlement: 28.7.1939

“… I want to add the e thank s of the staff for the assistance Miss Burton gave at the hospital during a very taxing outbreak of pneumonia cases and flu among the staff; and for Miss Scott ‘s relief in the school. The natives all, young and old, have a very deep affection for Miss Burton and the caravan visit will long impress itself on all our memories as a happy, profitable occasion.”

Tour through Bencubbin-Nungarin: 7-27 March 1940 (The Revd Peter Hodge)

” The amount of good Miss Burton does is incalculable – she conducted services in places which have never had Good Friday or Holy Week Services before. Her work is almost perfect.

It is impossible to separate the caravaner from the caravan and vice-versa, and when I say that the caravan is a great asset to the parishes, I indicate that the Moving Church itself and Miss Burton as the Minister of that Moving Church are practically indispensable. “

 

If you would like to view the letters in their original format, please contact the office and we would love to show them to you.


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Monday Memories – Links with GFS and Perth Orphanage, Swan Homes

There was a long association between GFS and the girls of Perth Orphanage from the time it was in Adelaide Terrace until the girls moved in 1942 to join the boys at the Swan Orphanage because of wartime bombings in the north of the State. The name was then changed to Swan Homes. It became a tradition in the 1940’s for the girls to be invited to a Christmas party at GFS Headquarters and this was organised over a long period by Mrs. Margaret Moore (the wife of the Dean), who was the President of GFS at the time. She was assisted by members of the Orana club and the House Mother at Headquarters, as well as leaders and members from the branches. The hall was always gaily decorated and the paper hats and sweet baskets were made by the helpers.

As the Headquarters building was near the corner of High and Pier Streets, it was only a short walk to the Deanery after the party tea, to play games on the lawn behind the Deanery during the years that Mrs Moore lived there. Then it was back to Headquarters for a concert before they returned home. They were up to 60 girls from Swan attending these parties and there was usually 2 members from each branch there as well. For many years the little visitors were given gift as well as sweets before they left. However as they received many gifts from organisations at Christmas, it was suggested that branches arrange to send a birthday gift to each girl instead and also keep in touch by writing . This was done for a long time and built up many friendships.

Some of the girls from Swan homes the GFS Lodge their home when they commenced work and Mrs Viva Sundercome, who was later to receive the MBE for her work on the Anglican Orphanages Board and for her work with GFS, started a fellowship club for them at GFS Headquarters. Some moved to the country and she kept in touch with them by letter.

When Swan Homes became Swanleigh in 1960, with a role as school hostel instead of an orphanage, the Christmas party became one for the girls from Parkerville Children’s Home, some of whom had actually been invited to parties before. The Orana Club and the House Mother continued to organise these with the help of Headquarters Townsend Members as well as leaders and GFSers

For more information on Swan Homes you can go to https://buff.ly/311zjz2


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Monday Memories – Part 1 – The GFS Caravan

From 1926 – 1943 (17 years) a ‘little house on wheels’, as the children called it, travelled through the outback of Western Australia, bringing friendship, comfort and the message of the Gospel to the settlers, and a special ministry to their children.
The story of the GFS caravan, which pioneered mission outreach by van in this State to isolated farms and little town, is one of great personal faith and incredible bravery on the part of the women who drove the van and accompanied the driver – travelling through the heat of summer and the bitterly cold, wet winters on roads that were more often than not just bush tracks, with corrugations, rocky surfaces and deep ridges worn by carts.

They found themselves bogged in mud in the winter and facing fallen trees, floods and other hazards. Under the rough conditions, mechanical breakdowns were frequent and very often far away from any help. The women who drove the van soon became, by necessity – very proficient at ‘running’ repairs.

Amongst those they visited were settlers on the Peel Estate and the Group settlement areas of the south-west; people who had come from England to start a new life after World War 1 – the majority without any farming experience and with only enthusiasm and an axe to get them on their way. By 1926, 10,000 immigrants had moved into the Group Settlements in the south-west. A large proportion of the Group Settlers belonged to the Church of England. This placed a very heavy responsibility on the church in WA. The GFS was enabled to help through its van.

But how did GFS become involved in this way?
https://1drv.ms/v/s!Au2ebJm4-bVkgvAJShzXyQbk-_1afg?e=SNCZoD


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Blessed to be a Blessing Ball

ONE MONTH TO GO!!! Come and join us at our Blessed to be a Blessing Ball https://buff.ly/2NfTIMS $80 per person (includes a 3 course meal – alcohol available for purchase at a cash bar) Photobooth fun and a DJ to dance the night away 💃🕺 So get your dancing shoes on and get a ticket today – why not grab some friends and get a table of 10 together


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Monday Memories – Part 2 – The GFS Lodge

Continuing our MM of the GFS Lodge, you will recall that The Society agreed to purchase a property. Mr Vincent a prominent Perth business man whose wife has been an Associate of St George’s Cathedral branch for many years and a friend of Mrs Ethel Burt co-operated with others to put up the required amount and soon afterwards he and Mr Loton became such generous benefactors to the Society.
The building at 240 Adelaide Terrace was in a poor condition when purchased and needed extensive renovations to make it suitable for its purpose. The Honorary Architect was Mr Herbert Parry and he worked tirelessly to develop a practical and attractive Lodge on the site. The cost to build the centre block and kitchen and renovate the existing buildings was 1,600 pounds (approximately AUS$162,000 in todays value).

Lady Barron, who was the wife of the Governor and also Patron of the Society, raised 1,000 pounds in a personal fund raising campaign. A leather bound book in which the donations are recorded are held in our archives. The GFS branches also contributed to the appeal. It is interesting to remember that during that time men earned approximately 1 pound per week!

The GFS Lodge was official opened by the Governor Sir Harry Barron on 5 June 1915 in the presence of a large gathering of people and officials. It was Lady Barron’s aim that the Lodge should be free of debt before she left WA and she made a special appeal in 1917 before she left. By 1920 1,874 pounds, plus interest, had been paid off the load, with 900 pounds still wing to Messrs Vincent and Loton. This they very generously liquidated, leaving the Lodge free of any debt and owned by GFS. In addition, money collected by the President, Mrs Riley, in a special appeal was returned to her by Messrs Vincent and Loton. This money was later used to help establish a hostel at Fremantle.

First photo is of Lady Barron and second is of Mr Loton (Mayor of Perth)


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Monday Memories

This week we are sharing our memories of another one of our early members Miss Margaret Milne Robertson. She was the GFS Secretary from 1931 to 1937. She was also Chairman of the Ethel Burt Townsend Fellowship during its most active period. She was a branch leader at South Perth and also GFS Representative on the Travellers’ Aid Society.

She met many migrants on their arrival at Fremantle and assisted them in every way possible. This was a work she continued over many years. Miss Milne Robertson organised many Easter camps in the hills and also went out in the GFS caravan when help was needed.

There was a great deal of work carried out from GFS Headquarters during the Depression years and Miss Milne Robertson played a major role in coordinating this.


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